Unit Two – Clean, Aseptic, and Sterile Technique

Learning Outcomes

Identify and apply the clean, aseptic, and sterile technique required for common OMS procedures

Goal

Prevent (nosocomial) healthcare associated infections

 

Proper use of a clean, aseptic, or sterile technique reduces or eliminates microbes transferred to patients during OMS procedures

 A clean technique is NOT used in a surgical, invasive procedure

ALL SURGICAL PROCEDURES IN OMS ARE INVASIVE PROCEDURES

Definition: Invasive Procedures

 Acts done to patients that come in contact with wounds, the blood stream, the inside of the body, or normally sterile parts of the body
 Invasive procedures invade the inside of the body
 Aseptic or Sterile techniques are used in invasive procedures
Aseptic Versus Sterile Technique:

The differences are subtle!

 Aseptic technique minimizes contamination by pathogens (bacteria, virus, or microorganism that can cause disease)

 Sterile technique refers to the absence of all pathogens

 

 Remember: DO TOUCH ANYTHING EXCEPT STERILE EQUIPMENT OR ITEMS THAT HAVE A BARRIER ONCE YOU’VE DONNED YOUR GLOVES!

 

Examples:

Pathogen Survival on Hard Surface
Herpes (simplex or zoster) 1 hour (3 days on hand towel)
Hepatitis B/C/D B: 1 week or more
HIV/AIDS 5-6 days
Cold & Flu Viruses 24 hours
Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) days-weeks

Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375115/

Remember that asepsis is the reduction of pathogens: be aware of all surfaces that can be contaminated.

Gloves are cheap, but if you’re organized you can reduce the number of gloves needed to maintain the chain of asepsis.

It’s easy to get a false sense of asepsis just because you’re wearing gloves.

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